Monday, November 29, 2010

BEE - Calculator

So there’s this Bureau of Energy Efficiency in India, which seems to be the driving force behind those star ratings that we end up seeing plastered over refrigerators and air conditioners, of late. In an effort to make it easy for customers to decide which refrigerator, or which air conditioner is more efficient, they’ve come up with a decent system of labelling products. The energy efficient labels are currently mandatory only for Frost-Free refrigerators, air-conditioners, Tungsten Filament Lamps, and Distribution Transformers. Apart from these, there are a host of home appliances that manufacturers could voluntarily get EE (Energy Efficient) labels for, such as direct cool Refrigerators, ceiling fans, gas stoves, washing machines, colour televisions, and such.

So, does this really save money for us, the end users? We’ve been about a little bit, eyeing the labels of several refrigerators, and we noticed one thing : A four-star refrigerator would end up drawing about 50% more electricity than a five-star refrigerator of the same capacity. In actual effect, the cash you end up saving may not be much – the difference could be about 200 extra units per year for a four-star rated refrigerator, versus a five-star rated refrigerator. However, think about the effect on the environment. In a day and age where we are (or atleast, should be) doing everything we can to reduce the impact on the environment, and reduce our energy consumption, even 200 units per year per household counts.

When it comes to air conditioners, it’s a totally different situation – you can save loads of money if you choose a five-star rated AC versus a one-star rated AC. Don’t believe us? Well then, dive into this handy little tool from the BEE, which helps you calculate the cost saved (or incurred) depending on the ACs you are using, or plan to use, in your home. (The screenshot of this tool is at the start of this article)

Finally, a note of caution – just because an appliance is rated five-star doesn’t mean that it will incur less expenses. For example, a humongous 600 litre refrigerator which is rated five-stars is still going to cost a huge lot in regular electricity bills. We guess that some decisions just require common sense… And no Government Bureau can provide a label for that.

4 comments:

jigneshdesai said...

1) How many units would a 310 litres Frost Free Refrigerator from L.G. consume in a year ?

2) How many units would a 390 litres Frost Free Refrigerator from L.G. consume in a year ?

jigneshdesai said...

1) How many units of Electricity would a 310 litres Frost Free L.G. Refrigerator consume in a year ?

2) How many units of Electricity would a 310 litres Frost Free L.G. Refrigerator consume in a year ?

jigneshdesai said...

How many units of Electricity would a 310 litres Frost Free L.G. Refrigerator consume in a year ?

How many units of Electricity would a 390 litres Frost Free L.G. Refrigerator consume in a year ?

The Indian Geek said...

Hi Jignesh,

We completely missed this comment - no idea how or why.

To answer both of your questions, each refrigerator has a different efficiency rating, which would give you a general idea of the amount of electricity consumed. The actual electricity consumed would vary depending upon the amount of items placed inside, the outside temperature, and the cooling power selected.

Generally, for the same refrigerator capacity, a 5-star Energy Efficiency rating would work best.

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